“Smeagull the Seagull” by Mark Seth Lender

smeagulltheseagullSmeagull the Seagull

Mark Seth Lender
Seahouse Press (2018)
ISBN 9781732192904
Reviewed by Ciara (age 12), Sarina (age 4) for Reader Views Kids (1/19)

A wonderfully illustrated and constructed book called, “Smeagull the Seagull” by Mark Seth Lender, is about a seagull and his relationship with humans. Birds are a lot smarter than we think and this true story is a great example of how we are connected to wildlife.

I think people should read this story to better understand that animals like Smeagull should be given respect just like humans. They are an important part of our world. They have feelings like us and are hungry and need shelter just like us. Animals have families that need the same love and care we show ours.

In this story you can see how Smeagull interacts with the main characters of the book. As if he were a person with the same needs as us. I liked the part in the story where the author had facial expressions that Smeagull would have when he felt a certain way. Since this is a true story, it would have been neat to see a seagull actually do this. It shows that animals can have personalities just like us. It really is an amazing thing when you think about it.

The pictures in the story were very life-like and descriptive, and I enjoyed showing them to my little sister, who loves birds. When I was reading the story to her, she pointed to the pictures of Smeagull and would say, “he is happy” or “he is sad,” just by seeing the expressions on his face. I think that was her favorite part of the book, to guess what Smeagull was feeling, and what he was going to do next. By the end of the book she wanted a pet seagull too.

“Smeagull the Seagull” by Mark Seth Lender was a realistic story that teaches us we need to show respect for all animals and the environment they live in. Animals like Smeagull have similar needs to ours, and this book is a great example of how they interact with us. My sister and I enjoyed reading this true story, and now have a better understanding of how close we resemble the way animals think.

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